Diversity Is The Key To Life, Part II

1.      I was introduced to your YouTube videos by afriend of mine, and I really enjoy them. You seem to have a bubbly,down-to-earth personality, and it’s a pleasure to watch. Would you tell me moreabout you and your reasoning for wanting to vlog/blog?

Aww, thank you! Well I started making YouTube videos in ’10, mostly just to have something to do. I had been transitioning for awhile and thought about doing the big chop after watching several people do it. At the time I was really heavy into wigs/weaves and thought that it might be fun to add my two cents to all the other reviews that were out there. Since then, my channel has grown and I now share a little bit of everything from natural hair to married life vlogs with my husband. Then last September, I started blogging at The Gabe Fix. I had recently gotten married and then moved from a big city to a very small town. I also wasn’t working at first, so the blog served as another method for me to creatively express myself.

2.      I love how you and your husband interact in thevlogs, and it’s always welcoming to see interracial couples interacting onscreen, especially when it involves a black woman since those types ofcouplings are rarely visible. Would you please share how you and your husbandmet, and how was the courtship?

It’s actually kind of a funny story – we went to the same high school and even graduated in the same class but never knew each other. Fast forward about 9yrs, he was working in Afghanistan as a contractor and created a Facebook page at the request of his nieces & nephew so they could communicate. When you first sign up for FB, it prompts you to find people that you went to school with and he saw my profile. He then commented on a photo of mine and after looking at his profile and seeing that we went to the same high school, I figured that I already knew him and responded. After that the rest is history, we started communicating every day via email, IM and then eventually the phone. On his breaks, he would come back to the states and we would spend time together and take trips. Although it was long distance, it was a lot of fun!

3.      I went to high school in Chattanooga, TN, andduring that time, I hardly ever saw black women/non-black men relationships. Actually,they were frowned upon yet black men/non-black women relationships werewelcomed (weird, I know). Since you reside in Tennessee, what has yourexperience been like, and do you get a chance to see other couples like you andyour husband?

It’s so interesting because where I grew up in Indianapolis, interracial relationships were very normal. Then I went to a black college for undergrad in TN and didn’t really see much of that at all. Since moving back to TN, I see a lot of black men/non-black women relationships. It’s very rare to see a relationship like mine. Surprisingly though, everyone is very friendly and accepting, they don’t treat us any differently (which was a concern of mine at first being in such a small place).

4.      Natural hair care is becoming a priority of mineagain since growth is one of my yearly goals. You have a plethora ofinformative and exciting videos about your hair care, and I’m sure your hubbyloves how you maintain and keep your style changing. Has your hair ever playeda part in your relationship (i.e. accepting, non-accepting), and what styles doyou prefer to do when going out on date nights?

The fact that my hair is such a huge part of me left no choice but for it to play a part in my relationship. Thankfully, my husband was very familiar with our hair and all the different options out there. He has always been accepting and supportive of all my styles – he loves them! When going out on date nights, sometimes I’ll throw a wig on or pull my hair up in a high bun just to give something a little different from my signature twist out.

5.      I’m a newlywed, and so far it has been a blast! Yes,I know it won’t ever be like this, but basking in it is a joy. What advicewould you share for any newlywed, and where do you see your family in the nextfive years?

My advice would be to ALWAYS communicate openly. If you can’t have a much needed conversation with your spouse then you’re in big trouble. Also keep things fresh and try new things, give each other space to do whatever it is you enjoy on your own. Most importantly, enjoy every single moment! In the next five years, I see us raising our 2-3 kids in a big city with lots of diversity and culture; progressing in our careers and just making the best of this thing called life.

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